Tonsil and Nasal Flesh

Tonsil and Nasal Flese: Tonsils (tonsil) and nasal flesh (adenoid), called lymphoid tissue and play a role in the body’s immune system. The tonsils are located at the entrance of the pharynx on both sides of the tongue root. The adenoid, called nasopharynx, is located in the upper part of the pharynx, that is, in the back of the nasal cavity.
Tonsil and Nasal Flese Tasks: Tonsil and adenoid lymphoid tissue is a part of and contains lymphocytes. These lymphocytes produce antibodies that help the body’s immune system. However, the roles of tonsils and adenoids in the immune system are not significant and are often not functional. Tonsils and nasal flesh in people who do not have any negative immune status shows this.
What Causes Problems: Tonsil and adenoid can cause some problems depending on both infections and size. Although adenoid is mostly the problem of childhood, tonsil can cause disease in both children and adults. Frequent infections affect the daily life of the patient and cause frequent drug use. However, the most important consequences of infections (inflammation), heart valves, joints and kidneys are at risk.
In addition to infections, the size of the tonsil and adenoid also have important consequences. Tonsils are large; swallowing, feeding and speech problems.Also food and tissue residues accumulated on the tonsil cause bad breath and poor hygiene. The large adenoid tissue causes nasal congestion. It causes open mouth sleep and snoring in these patients. The nose adjusts the temperature and humidity of the inhaled air and retains some harmful particles. Therefore, it causes some respiratory problems in patients breathing mouth. Nasal flesh also poses the following problems:
> Ventilation disorder in the middle ear and the resulting ear has to collapse, hearing loss and communication disorder. Hearing loss is sometimes at a level that the parents cannot notice, but it is often the first cause that leads the patient to a doctor.
> Impairment of jaw and facial bones
> Sore throat (pharyngitis), cough and lower respiratory problems
> Headache
> Sinusitis
> ‘Idiot’ image due to facial expression
How to Treat: In acute inflammation of tonsils and nasal flesh, treatment is usually medication. Antibiotics, painkillers and antihistamines are the most commonly used drugs. Although tonsils and nasal flesh are treated with drugs that do not cause serious problems and do not cause frequent infections, sometimes tonsils and nasal flesh should be taken.
When to take the decision to take the tonsil and adenoid, sometimes easy, but sometimes requires a certain period of follow-up. The conditions that lead to the decision of the surgery are:
> Frequent infection: The generally accepted condition is three or more infections per year in successive years.
> Tonsillary infection to grow up to make it difficult to swallow
> Unilateral growth of the tonsillar tissue (since it may be a sign of lymphoma or other malignant diseases)
> Frequent accumulation of tonsils, causing bad breath
> Adenoid tissue enlargement to impair breathing
> Frequent sinusitis and lower respiratory tract problems
Age at which surgery should be performed: There is no definite age for surgery. It is decided according to the damage caused by the disease to the patient. It is commonly accepted that the patient is 3 years old for tonsil surgery. Adenoid removal can be performed even at the age of 1 year. Waiting for the child to grow up many times can be harmful to the patient and reduces treatment success.

Tonsil and Nasal Flesh Surgery How to Perform: Although local anesthesia is sometimes performed for tonsil adenoid tissue requires general anesthesia. The removal of the Tonsil is achieved by the appropriate incision and removal with the surrounding capsule. Adenoid surgery involves enlarging the enlarged tissue. The operation time is usually short and varies between 30-60 minutes. Post-operative hospitalization is usually not required. Sometimes it may be necessary to stay in hospital for 1 night especially in terms of the risk of bleeding.
What are the risks and complications of surgery: As with any surgery, tonsil and nasal surgery can have risks and complications. Local or general anesthesia always carries some risks. However, advances in anesthesia techniques and drugs reduce this risk day by day. The most common complication is bleeding. Although it can sometimes reach serious dimensions, this problem is rarely seen with careful and meticulous study and proper follow-up of the patient. There is a belief that pharyngitis occurs after surgery. This is a wrong idea. Patients may be mistaken if they expect that there will be no sore throat after taking the tonsils. The present pharyngitis has nothing to do with the removal of tonsils. Sometimes even infected tonsils increase pharyngitis.
What should be considered after surgery: The most important rules to be followed are nutrition. Cold and liquid foods should be selected, especially as the bleeding is more likely in the first 3 days. For this reason, cold milk, soup, fruit juice, custard, ice cream are ideal foods. On the first day of surgery, dark blood vomiting is normal and is related to blood swallowed during surgery. However, constant red new blood requires immediate medical attention. From day 4, normal food is slowly passed. If the patient does not want to eat anything because of the pain, the pain will continue. Plenty of liquid should be taken. A slight fever is expected after surgery. It is usually returned to normal with adequate fluid intake and antipyretic drugs. Sometimes patients complain that inflammation develops in the tonsils area by contacting a doctor a few days after surgery. This is usually misleading the healing tissue that forms a white veil in that area after the tonsils are removed.